12
Jun

We got 1880 grand piano, we removed all strings and after 3 months we put them back. From then i tuned my piano 0n 430 Hz 4 times, and after week it needs to be tuned again….Is it normal?

Contrary to the person who posted above, old pianos do not deteriorate with age if they are kept in good condition.

You don’t specify whether you used the old strings again or new strings. In either case the piano needs time to settle in. It has thousands of moving parts and being largely wood, it takes time for them to adjust.

The other thing that could be wrong is that your tuning pegs are loose. If they’re only a little loose, some violin peg dope might help, or tapping them in lightly might help too. Please don’t do anything without having a professional tuner look at it.

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This entry was posted on Friday, June 12th, 2009 at 4:38 pm and is filed under piano tuning. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or TrackBack URI from your own site.

3 Responses so far to "Help about piano tuning after being restringed?"

  1. 1 Doctor John
    June 9th, 2009 at 10:20 pm  

    I am curious as to why you removed and then replaced the strings?

    Was the action re-built?
    1880 is very old for a piano, as unlike other instruments they deteriorate rather than improve with age.

    I suspect that having not been under tension for 3 months the instrument needs some time to settle down. Make sure it is in a room with stable temperature and humidity.
    References :

  2. 2 duhmightybeanz
    June 9th, 2009 at 10:38 pm  

    A piano is made of wood so logically its susceptible to changes in the environment mainly the moisture in the air(humidity) and if it is exposed to sunlight…keep ur piano away from sunlight and make sure it isn’t humid and u should be fine…anyways a normal A is 440Hz why did u tune 430?
    References :

  3. 3 geekchick
    June 9th, 2009 at 11:11 pm  

    Contrary to the person who posted above, old pianos do not deteriorate with age if they are kept in good condition.

    You don’t specify whether you used the old strings again or new strings. In either case the piano needs time to settle in. It has thousands of moving parts and being largely wood, it takes time for them to adjust.

    The other thing that could be wrong is that your tuning pegs are loose. If they’re only a little loose, some violin peg dope might help, or tapping them in lightly might help too. Please don’t do anything without having a professional tuner look at it.
    References :
    M.M., voice and piano teacher for over twenty years, now in D/FW.

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